September 3, 2017

Edith Louisa Cavell (/ˈkævəl/; 4 December 1865 – 12 October 1915) was a British nurse. She is celebrated for saving the lives of soldiers from both sides without discrimination and in helping some 200 Alliedsoldiers escape from German-occupied Belgium during the First World War, for which she was arrested. She was accused of treason, found guilty by a court-martial and sentenced to death. Despite international pressure for mercy, she was shot by a German firing squad. Her execution received worldwide condemnation and extensive press coverage.

Source: Wikipedia


September 2, 2017

Margaretha Geertruida "Margreet" MacLeod(née Zelle; 7 August 1876 – 15 October 1917), better known by the stage name Mata Hari, was a Dutch exotic dancer and courtesan who was convicted of being a spy for Germanyduring World War I and executed by firing squad in France.

Source: Wikipedia


September 1, 2017

Rachel Louise Carson (May 27, 1907 – April 14, 1964) was an American marine biologist, author, and conservationist whose book Silent Spring and other writings are credited with advancing the global environmental movement.

Source: Wikipedia


August 31, 2017

Sylvia Rae Rivera (July 2, 1951 – February 19, 2002) was an American gay liberation and transgender activist and self identified "drag queen". She was a founding member of both the Gay Liberation Front and the Gay Activists Alliance. With her close friend Marsha P. Johnson, Rivera co-founded the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries(STAR), a group dedicated to helping homeless young drag queens and trans women of color.

Source: Wikipedia


August 30, 2017

Angela Yvonne Davis (born January 26, 1944) is an American political activist, academic, and author. She emerged as a prominent counterculture activist and radical in the 1960s, and had close relations with the Black Panther Party through her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Source: Wikipedia


August 29, 2017

Hatshepsut (also Hatchepsut; meaning Foremost of Noble Ladies; 1507–1458 BCE) was the fifth pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt. She was the second historically confirmed female pharaoh, the first being Sobekneferu.Hatshepsut came to the throne of Egypt in 1478 BCE. Officially, she ruled jointly with Thutmose III, who had ascended to the throne the previous year as a child of about two years old. Hatshepsut was the chief wife of Thutmose II, Thutmose III’s father. She is generally regarded by Egyptologists as one of the most successful pharaohs, reigning longer than any other woman of an indigenous Egyptian dynasty. According to Egyptologist James Henry Breasted she is also known as "the first great woman in history of whom we are informed."



August 28, 2017

Charles-Geneviève-Louis-Auguste-André-Timothée d'Éon de Beaumont (5 October 1728 – 21 May 1810), usually known as the Chevalier d'Éon, was a French diplomat, spy, freemason[2] and soldier who fought in the Seven Years' War. D'Éon had natural abilities as a mimic, good features for a spy. D'Éon appeared publicly as a man and pursued traditionally masculine occupations for 49 years, although during that time d'Éon successfully infiltrated the court of Empress Elizabeth of Russia by presenting as a woman. For 33 years, from 1777, d'Éon dressed as a woman, identifying as female. 


August 27, 2017

Louise Lawrence worked as an artist and manager of a women-only apartment complex in San Francisco; in the 1940s, she began living full-time as a woman. She lived in the apartment complex with her partner. As an activist, she helped create a correspondence network for transgender women throughout the United States. She also worked with Alfred Kinsey and Dr. Harry Benjamin as they studied transgender people. Most importantly, her work helped create connection and communication in the trans community and was the first to work toward that goal.

Source: StudyBreaks


August 26, 2017

Ōyama Sutematsu (大山 捨松, March 16, 1860 – February 18, 1919) (born Yamakawa Sakiko,later Yamakawa Sutematsu) was a Japanese woman of the Meiji era, who was a prominent social figure. She was born in Aizuto a family of senior retainers serving Matsudaira Katamori. In December 1871 she was sent to the United States for study, as part of the Iwakura Mission. She was placed in the household of Leonard Bacon where she befriended his daughter Alice. The two lived like sisters for ten years learning each other's cultures. Sutematsu eventually graduated from Vassar College. Sutematsu's brothers, Yamakawa Kenjirō and Yamakawa Hiroshi, were famous in their own right, during the Meiji era.

Sutematsu married the Imperial Japanese Army general (and former Satsuma retainer) Ōyama Iwao; rather ironically, Ōyama had served as an artilleryman during the bombardment of Sutematsu's hometown of Aizu.

After Ōyama's death, Sutematsu died from the 1918 flu pandemic in 1919.

Source: Wikipedia


August 25, 2017 
Soraya Tarzi, known mostly as Queen Soraya (November 24, 1899 – April 20, 1968), was the Queen consort of Afghanistan in the early 20th century and the wife of King Amanullah Khan. Born in Syria, she was educated by her father, who was the Afghan leader and intellectual Sardar Mahmud Tarzi. She belonged to the Mohammadzai Pashtun tribe, a powerful sub-tribe of the Barakzai dynasty. Soraya Tarzi was King Amanullah Khan's only wife, which broke centuries of tradition. It was when she married into the monarchy that she grew to be one of the region's most important figures. In 1928 Queen Soraya received an Honorary Degree from University of Oxford. As Queen of Afghanistan, she was not only filling a position – but became one of the most influential women in the world at the time. At a public function, Amanullah said that "Islam did not require women to cover their bodies or wear any special kind of veil". At the conclusion of the speech, Queen Soraya tore off her veil (hejab) in public and the wives of other officials present at the meeting followed this example. Throughout her husband's reign, Queen Soraya wore wide-brimmed hats with a diaphanous veil attached to them. Many women from Amanullah‘s family publicly participated in organizations and went on to become government officials later in life. Upon her family's return, she would meet and marry King Amanullah Khan. Queen Soraya encouraged women to get an education and opened the first school for girls in Kabul. She sent 15 young women to Turkey for higher education in 1928. Soraya was very instrumental in enforcing change for women and publicly exhorted them to be active participants in nation building. She founded the first magazine for women called Ershad-I-Niswan (Guidance for Women). Source: Wikipedia


August 24, 2017

Amanirenas (also spelled Amanirena) was a queen of the Meroitic Kingdom of Kush. 
Her full name and title was Amnirense qore li kdwe li ("Ameniras, Qore and Kandake"). She reigned from about 40 BCE to 10 BCE. She is one of the most famous kandakes, because of her role leading Kushite armies against the Romans in a war that lasted five years, from 27 BCE to 22 BCE. After an initial victory when the Kushites attacked Roman Egypt, they were driven out of Egypt by Gaius Petronius and the Romans established a new frontier at Hiere Sycaminos (Maharraqa).Amanirenas was described as brave, and blind in one eye.

Meroitic inscriptions give Amanirenas the title of qore as well as kandake suggesting that she was a ruling queen. She is usually considered to be the queen referred to as "Candace" in Strabo's account of the Meroitic war against the Roman Empire. Her name is associated with those of Teriteqas and Akinidad. The scheme first proposed by Hintze suggests that King Teriteqas died shortly after the beginning of the war. She was succeeded by Akinidad (possibly the son of Teriteqas) who continued the campaign with his mother Amanirenas. Akinidad died at Dakka c.24BC.

Source: Wikipedia


August 23, 2017

Onake Obavva (18th Century) was a woman who fought the forces of Hyder Ali single-handedly with a pestle (Onake) in the kingdom of Chitradurga of Karnataka, India. Her husband was a guard of a watchtower in the rocky fort of Chitradurga. In the state of Karnataka, she is celebrated along with Abbakka Rani, Keladi Chennamma and Kittur Chennamma, as the foremost women warriors and patriots.

During the reign of Madakari Nayaka, the city of Chitradurga was besieged by the troops of Hyder Ali (1754-1779). A chance sighting of a man entering the Chitradurga fort through a hole in the rocks led to a plan by Hyder Ali to send his soldiers through that hole. The Guard (Kahale Mudda Hanuma, who was on duty near that hole) had gone home to have his lunch. During his meal he needed some water to drink, so his wife Obavva went to collect water in a pot from a pond which was near the hole in the rocks, halfway up the hill. She noticed the army trying to enter the fort through the hole. She used the Onake or pestle (a wooden long club meant for pounding paddy grains) to kill the soldiers one by one by hitting them on the head and then quietly moving the dead without raising the suspicions of the rest of the troops. Mudda Hanuma, Obavva's husband, returned from lunch, was shocked to see Obavva standing with a blood stained Onake and several of the enemies' dead bodies around her. Later, the same day, she was found dead either due to shock or having been killed by the enemy soldiers. She belonged to the Holayas(Chalavadi) community. Though her brave attempt saved the fort this time, Madakari could not resist the attack by Hyder Ali during 1779, when the fort of Chitradurga was lost to Hyder Ali. She is considered to be the epitome of Kannada female pride. The hole through which Hyder Ali's soldiers sneaked is called Onake Obavvana Kindi (kindi=hole) or Onake kindi. Her heroic effort is depicted in a famous song-sequence in Nagarahavu picture directed by Puttanna Kanagal. The sports stadium in Chitradurga - Veera Vanithe Onake Obavva Stadium, is named after her.

Source: Wikipedia


August 22, 2017

Janet Guthrie (born March 7, 1938, in Iowa City, Iowa) is a retired professional race cardriver and the first woman to qualify and compete in both the Indianapolis 500 and the Daytona 500. Guthrie was originally an aerospace engineerand after graduating from the University of Michigan, she worked with Republic Aviation. She began racing in 1963 on the SCCA circuit in a Jaguar XK 140 and by 1972, she was racing on a full-time basis.

In the 1976 World 600, Guthrie finished 15th, becoming the first woman to compete in a NASCAR Winston Cup superspeedway race. Guthrie would go on to compete in four more races that season. The following season, she competed in her first Daytona 500, finishing 12th when her car's engine blew two cylinders with ten laps to go. For the race, though, she still earned the honor of Top Rookie. Overall, Guthrie went on to compete in 33 races in NASCAR over four seasons.[3] Her highest finish, sixth place at Bristol in 1977, is the best finish by a woman in a top-tier NASCAR race, now currently tied with Danica Patrick in 2014.

Guthrie qualified for and competed in the 1977 Indianapolis 500, but finished 29th with engine troubles. She would compete in two more Indy 500s, finishing ninth in the 1978 race. Overall, she competed in 11 Indy carevents with a best finish of fifth. During her unsuccessful bid to qualify for the 1976 race, many of the drivers in the male-dominated sport stated that the reason she did not qualify was mainly due to her gender. These comments angered then three-time champion A. J. Foyt to the point he lent Guthrie a back-up car to conduct a shake-down test. Her top practice lap in Foyt's car would have been adequate to qualify for the field. Largely because of her gender, she was unable to obtain funding through corporate sponsorship, and was forced into retirement.

Source: Wikipedia



August 21, 2017

Winona LaDuke (born August 18, 1959) is an American environmentalist, economist, and writer, known for her work on tribal land claims and preservation, as well as sustainable development. In 1996 and 2000, she ran for Vice President as the nominee of the Green Party of the United States, on a ticket headed by Ralph Nader. In the 2016 presidential election, she became the first Native American woman to receive an electoral vote for Vice President of the United States.

She is the executive director of Honor the Earth, a Native environmental advocacy organization that plays an active role in the Dakota Access Pipeline protests.

Source: Wikipedia


August 20, 2017

Debra Ann Fischer is a professor of astronomy at Yale University researching detection and characterization of exoplanets. She was part of the team to discover the first known multiple-planet system. Fischer has co-authored over 100 papers on dwarf stars and sub-stellar mass objects in the galactic neighborhood, including many on extrasolar planets. She is a principal investigator with the N2K Consortiumsearching for exoplanets. She is also a member of the planet search team led by Geoffrey Marcy looking for extrasolar planets. She was the primary investigator for Chiron, the CTIO High Resolution Spectrometer. In 2011, she started the Fiber-optic Improved Next-generation Doppler Search for Exo-Earths with the Planetary Society, an instrument that will help planet hunters find Earth-like extrasolar planets.

Source: Wikipedia


August 19, 2017

Gertrude Caroline Ederle (October 23, 1905 – November 30, 2003) was an American competition swimmer, Olympic champion, and former world record-holder in five events. On 6 August 1926, she became the first woman to swim across the English Channel. Among other nicknames, the press sometimes called her "Queen of the Waves." Source: Wikipedia


August 18, 2017

Florence Barbara Seibert (October 6, 1897 – August 23, 1991) was an American biochemist. She is best known for identifying the active agent in the antigen tuberculin as a protein, and subsequently for isolating a pure form of tuberculin, purified protein derivative(PPD), enabling the development and use of a reliable TB test. Seibert is a member of the U.S. National Women's Hall of Fame.

Source: Wikipedia



August 17, 2017

Kanaklata Barua (Assamese: কনকলতা বৰুৱা) (22 December 1924 – 20 September 1942) also called Birbala and Shaheed (martyr) Kanaklata Barua was an Indian freedom fighter from Assam who was shot dead while leading a procession bearing the National Flag during the Quit India Movement of 1942. During the Quit India Movement Kanaklata joined the Mrityu Bahini, a death squad comprising groups of youth from the Gohpur sub division of Assam. On 20 September 1942, the Bahini decided it would hoist the national flag at the local police station. A procession of unarmed villagers were led by Barua to do so. The police under Rebati Mahan Som the officer in-charge of the police station warned the procession of dire consequences if they proceeded with their plan. Undeterred by the police, the procession continued marching ahead when the police fired upon the procession. Kanaklata was shot and the flag she was carrying with her was taken up by Mukunda Kakoti who too was shot at. Both Kanaklata and Kakoti were killed in the police action. Kanaklata was only 17 years of age at the time of her martyrdom.

Source: Wikipedia